San Diego Researchers Study CBD For Migraines

CBD For Migraines
CBD For Migraines
CBD For Migraines
CBD For Migraines

Migraines tend to occur with intense, debilitating symptoms. Those issues cause pulsating or throbbing headaches, alongside nausea, and occasionally sensitivity to sound and light, vomiting, or both. A spell of migraine is likely to last even days. Many people try to use medication for years but to little avail. That is especially true for those with migraines triggered by factors such as weather, sleep deficiency, and stress. If the pain reaches peak levels, then you might want to be in bed throughout the day without the lights.

There are several FDA-approved treatment options in the market, but many individuals are relying on cannabis derivatives such as THC and CBD for migraines. They have been experiencing migraines for years and trying prescription medication before turning to those alternative treatment options. According to pain specialists, that is an instance of self-treating through cannabis. When people ask the specialists whether CBD oil for migraines works, they would point to the lack of evidence for an informed opinion.

UC San Diego Health’s headache neurologist Nathaniel Schuster, plus other professionals are doing a randomized control trial with placebo and cannabis. With the trial, they aim to find whether cannabis is potentially effective in treating acute migraines.

Around 20 people are in the trial, including long-time migraine patient Allison Knigge. Schuster played a part in Knigge being involved in the trial. At that time, she was ready to try any product that could aid in managing her migraines.

The researchers aim to enrol 70 more people and randomize them to manage four separate spells of migraine with a placebo, CBD, THC, and a blend of both cannabinoids. They would have the products administered to the participants through a vaporizer.

As for Schuster, vaporized cannabis may be more effective for migraine patients with gastrointestinal issues or nausea. To be eligible for it, the trial requires you to have migraines monthly, to not be an opioid user or regular cannabis consumer, and be aged 21 to 65 years.

Knigge feels grateful that she gets to participate in a trial that could increase the treatment options for migraine sufferers like her. It could result in another option when every other treatment has not worked, she said. That is significant for people with lives regularly disrupted due to migraines.

Schuster said that different cannabinoid dosage comparisons would be part of future studies.